Chore

People with limitations in mobility and self-care may receive chore aides for help with daily living. These services are provided for people who have no one else in the household who is capable of performing the tasks or financially providing for them.

People with limitations in mobility and self-care may receive chore aides for help with daily living. These services are provided for people who have no one else in the household who is capable of performing the tasks or financially providing for them.

Services include:

  • Cleaning appliances, including cleaning ovens and defrosting and cleaning refrigerators; replacing fuses, light bulbs; repairing electric plugs, frayed cords
  • Cleaning and securing carpets and rugs; cleaning and waxing wood or tile floors; washing walls and windows
  • Installing window shades, blinds and curtain rods; hanging draperies; installing screens; installing and removing storm doors and windows
  • Moving or rearranging furniture to provide safe entry, mobility and egress; turning mattresses
  • Cleaning closets and drawers; cleaning attics, basements, porches and outbuildings to remove fire and health hazards
  • Cleaning of exterior surfaces, such as removing mildew from siding or decks
  • Pest control, interior and exterior
  • Grass cutting and leaf raking; clearing walkways of ice, snow and leaves
  • Clearing interior and exterior debris following natural disasters; trimming overhanging tree branches
  • Changing interior and exterior light bulbs; changing batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors

Service activities performed by chore service workers do not include:

  • Any routine housekeeping and home management tasks performed by homemaker service agencies

The Division of Aging Services (DAS) administers this program through the Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs). Contact your local AAA for more information.